The Mauna Kea Line

Introducing the Mauna Kea Line:

maunakealine

Perhaps you are familiar with the International Date Line.  The IDL is an imaginary line (conjured into being in the late 19th century by ambitious industrialists of the day), that meanders drunkenly across the Pacific, basically as far away as humanly possible as they could get it from themselves.  Out here — in the middle of their nowhere — their equally imaginary ʻzonesʻ of time meet up with their illogical conclusions, and ʻtodayʻ is divided from ʻtomorrowʻ… and all temporal hell breaks loose.

Hypothetically,  along the IDL you could sail back and forth in time between yesterday and today just by criss-crossing this line… a notion so delightfully preposterous Umberto Ecco wrote a book about it, The Island of the Day Before.  As a modern twist on the old saying might go, “Imaginary this, imaginary that — pretty soon youʻre talking pure BS about nothing.”  Umberto would simply say “Reductio Absurdum”.

The Mauna Kea Line is somewhat less imaginary, in that it references an actual thing — Mauna Kea, the tallest peak on the planet — rather than a nebulous 19th century international agreement.  As you may guess, the Mauna Kea Line is the meridian of longitude of Mauna Kea.

Alternatively, this meridan could equally be described as 155.5 east of London, or 204.5 west of London (if you remain perversely inclined to define the location of everything in the world in relation to London…).  However, the Mauna Kea Line as the foundation of a new geography of time, is the new zero, and “now everywhere” is defined as:

“a percentage of planetary revolution in respect to the Sun from the Mauna Kea Line.”

 

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